ARTISTS IN ISOLATION | 2020

Josephine Jakobi

Lakes Entrance, May 2020

I went to Cape Conran in February. The totally blackened landscape shocked me. I looked for signs of life and found fungi.

The totally blackened landscape shocked me.

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I looked for signs of life and found fungi. ​

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I bought 10 metres of tarlatan, folded in a certain way, practiced on paper first, then went back to Conran on April 1st and buried the cloth in the ash and sand, in the burnt tea tree.

I bought 10 metres of tarlatan, folded in a certain way, practiced on paper first...

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... then went back to Conran on April 1st and buried the cloth in the ash and sand, in the burnt tea tree.

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On April 28 I returned to Conran, travelling for work you understand, and dug up the fabric. I have just unfolded it on the studio floor. I’m not sure what I will do with this, but I am pleased with the result.

I returned to Conran, travelling for work you understand, and dug up the fabric...

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I have just unfolded it on the studio floor. I’m not sure what I will do with this, but I am pleased with the result.

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Well, more isolated than lockdown, really.

 

I have been investigating what lives in a community of Black Wattles and accumulating glass vessels. Now I have an architecture of glass and small plant samples. It’s a lovely game to play...

I created a frottage triptych from the trunk of a fallen Wattle. Graphite on cotton. More evidence of Wattle ecology...

... investigating what lives in a community of Black Wattles and accumulating glass vessels. Now I have an architecture of glass and small plant samples. It’s a lovely game to play...

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Making a frottage from the trunk of a fallen Wattle

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Frottage triptych from the trunk of a fallen Wattle. Graphite on cotton. More evidence of Wattle ecology.

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 -Josephine Jakobi, Lakes Entrance, May 2020